Home
Exhibitors
About Us
Calendar of Events
Membership
Committees
Volunteer
Events
Newsletters
Career Opportunities
Links/Resources
Login/Logout
<<      November 2014      >>
S
M
T
W
T
F
S
      
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
      
 2 events 
 
 
 
Photo Albums

Upcoming Events

Just the Facts! 2014 Workshop Series
Click here to learn more about this comprehensive training series for new financial aid professionals. Registration is open!


2014 MASFAA Conference
The excitement of the fall semester beginning is in the air! What else is in the air? More info on the MASFAA website about the annual conference including hotel information and the agenda! I would encourage you to take a look and make your reservations soon this conference is not to be missed! When: Nov. 13 - 14 - Where: The UMass Lowell Inn and Conference Center at 50 Warren St., Lowell, MA 01852- Click above for more info!


Contact your MASFAA Representative
 
 
   
   
   Member Last Name
         Keyword Site Search

          Latest News (View News Archives)
NASFAA RSS Feed
"Even if new graduates are lucky enough to find a job after graduation, most won't last more than a year," Main Street reports.
"In an interview with Marketplace's Kai Ryssdal, Secretary of Education Arne Duncan said new rules targeting vocational college programs that leave students with too much debt and too few job prospects were designed with 'outcomes, not inputs' in mind," Marketplace reports.
"About half of the students attending community college under Tennessee Promise next fall will get their tuition paid by the federal government, according to state estimates," Nashville Public Radio reports.
"Since 1985, U.S. college costs have surged by about 500 percent, and tuition fees keep rising. In Germany, they've done the opposite," The Washington Post reports.
"Battles over funding and college costs are being fought in races for governor across the country," Inside Higher Ed reports.
"Bloomberg Philanthropies announced this week a new effort to help talented low- and middle-income students enroll in and graduate from top-tier colleges and universities. While every intervention is welcome, this one assumes that a major problem is getting these students to apply to these institutions," Catharine Hill writes for The Chronicle of Higher Education.
As widely reported in the press, the Department of Education has released a final rule on gainful employment programs. ED will only judge programs on their graduates' debt-to-earnings ratios, which must be less than or equal to 8 percent of income and 20 percent of discretionary income to pass. Programs that post income and discretionary income percentages between 8 and 12 or 20 and 30, respectively, will be considered in a warning zone, and programs with percentages higher than 12 and 30, respectively, will fail. The final rules do offer limited opportunities for program improvement, as federal student aid eligibility will only be affected if a program fails two years in a three-year period or does not pass (i.e., fails or is in the zone) for four consecutive years. Check back in with Today's News Monday for a summary of the final rule.
"Ask a millennial why so many twentysomethings live with their parents, and he’ll probably let out an exasperated sigh and then patiently explain that we're a whole generation loaded down with student debt and navigating an economy that's been cruddy for years. It’s hard to make your rent when you’re jobless and paying off a bachelor’s degree," Slate's MoneyBox reports.
"A $10 million gift to Yale University will go toward scholarships for low-income Chinese students," Inside Higher Ed reports.
"There’s a debate whether a recent boom in online-university courses democratizes higher education, or provides a playground for the wealthy," The Wall Street Journal's Digits reports.
Under the Higher Education Act of 1965, financial aid administrators have the authority to make Professional Judgment (PJ) adjustments for students who have special circumstances. We're curious... what is the PJ adjustment request related to cost of attendance (COA) your office receives most frequently? Please take a second to complete this poll to let us know what type of request you get most often. Once you've submitted your answer you'll be able to see how your office compares to that of your peers. Take the poll now!
"The Education Department will release on Thursday the final version of its 'gainful employment' rule—the subject of years of intense debate, revision, and litigation," The Chronicle of Higher Education reports.
A new online tool from the University of Texas System aims to help students make more informed decisions about their education and future careers by offering comprehensive data on employment outcomes of UT graduates.
"For some years now, Sen. Richard J. Durbin, a Democrat from Illinois, has waged a war against for-profit colleges and universities," Paul Alexander writes in a commentary piece for Roll Call.
"For many students, what they'll pay to attend college​ isn't clear. ​But paying for college doesn't have to remain a mystery," according to U.S. News and World Report. "'While [online tools] might not be able to offer​ a precise number, they give families a ballpark,' says Megan McClean, the National Association of Financial Aid Administrators'​ managing director of policy and federal relations."
 
The Massachusetts Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators
empowers its members to be educated, engaged, and effective professionals.



Questions?
General: support@masfaa.org
Membership: membership@masfaa.org
Listserv: list-owner@masfaa.org

Privacy Statement                Site Map                Website Help